Books are a great way to tie in the healthy lessons you are teaching your kids.

Whether you are teaching about new vegetables, or use a book’s rhyme to inspire a fun physical activity, children will appreciate reading time. The more you read to children at an early age, the more likely they will want to read on their own.

Check out this month’s recommended books:

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Stories About

Healthy Food and Beverages

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Stories About

Healthy Food and Beverages

Apples, Cherries, Red Raspberries: What is in the Fruits Group?
Brian Cleary
(Ages 6-9)
Cleary’s goofy verse and Martin Goneau’s humorous illustrations give young readers a whole crop of fruit examples and highlight some of their health benefits.

Black Beans and Lamb, Poached Eggs and Ham: What is in the Meat and Beans Group?
Brian Cleary
(Ages 6-9)
Brian P. Cleary’s goofy verse and Martin Goneau’s humorous illustrations give young readers oodles of examples from the meat and beans group and highlight some of their health benefits.

Green Beans, Potatoes and Even Tomatoes: What is in the Vegetables Group?
Brian Cleary
(Ages 6-9)
Brian P. Cleary’s goofy verse and Martin Goneau’s humorous illustrations give young readers a whole crop of vegetable examples and highlight some of their health benefits.

Macaroni and Rice and Bread by the Slice: What is in the Grains Group?
Brian Cleary
(Ages 6-9)
Cleary’s goofy verse and Martin Goneau’s humorous illustrations give young readers a whole crop of examples from the grains group and highlight some of their health benefits.

 

Yogurt and Cheeses and Ice Cream That Pleases: What is in the Milk Group?

Brian Cleary

(Ages 6-9)

Brian P. Cleary’s goofy verse and Martin Goneau’s humorous illustrations give young readers gallons of examples from the milk group and highlight some of their health benefits.

 

The Beastly Feast
Bruce Goldstone
(Ages 3-5)
Textured illustrations add vibrancy to a rhyming poem about an animal picnic.

Yum! ¡Mmmm! ¡Que rico! America’s Sproutings
Pat Mora
(Ages 6-8)
Using haiku and English text mixed with Spanish words, the author describes 14 types of food indigenous to the Americas.

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Stories to

Get Kids Moving

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Stories to

Get Kids Moving

Giraffes Can’t Dance
Giles Andreae
(Ages 4 and up)
Giraffes Can’t Dance is a touching tale of Gerald the giraffe, who wants nothing more than to dance. With crooked knees and thin legs, it’s harder for a giraffe than you would think.

My Daddy Is a Pretzel: Yoga for Parents and Kids
Baron Baptiste
(Ages 4 and up)
Discover a range of postures parents and children can share and find connections between these practices and everyday life. A Spanish edition is also available.

Dinosaur Dance!
Sandra Boynton
(Ages 1-5)
Whether they dance the Shimmy Shimmy Shake, the Quivery Quake, or just decide to Cha-Cha-Cha, young readers are sure to giggle along with these adorable creatures that are ready for a roaring good time.

Run For It
Matt Christopher
(Ages 7-8)
When his aunt is diagnosed with cancer, Theo, the former couch potato, begins training for the benefit race to raise funds for cancer research.

Run and Hike, Play and Bike: What Is Physical Activity?
Brian P. Cleary
(Ages 6-8)
Goofy verse and illustrations highlight the health benefits of exercising and eating right.

Bounce
Doreen Cronin
(Ages 2-7)
Bounce a ball right off your hands. Bounce it off your toes. Try to bounce a beach ball on the tip of your nose. Doreen Cronin and Scott Menchin invite toddlers to hop, leap, pounce and bounce.

We Are Girls Who Love to Run / Somos Chicas Y a Nosotras Nos Encanta
Brianna K. Grant
(Ages 5-8)
Diverse girls with various shapes, fitness levels, and ethnicities celebrate running, along with the camaraderie, patience, and fun it brings. Spanish and English editions available.

My Friend Maya Loves to Dance
Cheryl Willis Hudson
(Ages 5-7)
A young narrator tells readers about her friend Maya, who absolutely loves to dance. In this rhyming picture book, Maya attends a lively dance class. She can’t get enough of dance and even loves the hard work of practice.

Tai Chi for Kids: Move With the Animals
Stuart Alve Olson
(Ages 4–8)
Children can imitate various animals as they learn the eight basic forms of tai chi, which can improve balance, attention, and overall health.

Everyone Can Learn to Ride a Bicycle
Chris Raschka
(Ages 4-8)
Expressive pictures and limited text details the ups and downs as a father teaches his daughter to ride a bike.

If You’re Hoppy
April Pulley Sayre
(Ages 4-8)
Young listeners can engage with the actions of different hoppy animals as they hear a new take on the song If You’re Happy and You Know It . . .

 

Keep Running, Gingerbread Man! A Story About Keeping Active
Steve Smallman
(Ages 4 and up)
This twist on the classic story introduces health and fitness, as the Gingerbread Man outpaces and outwits the Fox chasing him.

 

Swift Walker: A Continental Journey
Verlyn Tarlton
(Ages 8-12)
Power your child’s imagination with real information from Swift Walker. Swift Walker introduces kids to the continents, maps, and basic geography concepts with a fun character they can relate to.

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Stories About

Reducing Screen Time

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Stories About

Reducing Screen Time

Library Lil
Suzanne Williams
(Ages 4-8 years)
A formidable librarian makes readers not only out of the book-resistant residents of her small town, but out of a tough-talking, television-watching motorcycle gang as well.

When the TV Broke
Harriet Ziefert
(Ages 4-8 years)
When the television breaks, Jeffrey is forced to find fun and imaginative ways to entertain himself. At first he is absolutely lost. Then he starts to read books, use his imagination and create things on his own.

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Stories About

Babies & Breastfeeding

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Stories About

Babies & Breastfeeding

Mama’s Milk

Michael Ross
(Ages 3-5 years)

Ross’s rhyming text describes the different ways that mothers (human and animal) nurse their babies. Each species is identified along with the proper name for its offspring.

 

Mama’s Milk Is All Gone

Ann Vernon
(Ages 2 -5 years)

The book recognizes the breastfeeding relationship that the child shared with their mother and how after weaning they have many different ways that they fill their physical and emotional needs in place of breastfeeding.