Books are a great way to tie in the healthy lessons you are teaching your kids.

Whether you are teaching about new vegetables, or use a book’s rhyme to inspire a fun physical activity, children will appreciate reading time. The more you read to children at an early age, the more likely they will want to read on their own.

Check out this month’s recommended books:

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Stories About

Healthy Food and Beverages

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Stories About

Healthy Food and Beverages

Oliver’s Fruit Salad
Vivian French
(Ages 3-6 years)
Oliver enjoys helping his grandfather grow and pick fruit from the garden, but he won’t eat any of it. Puzzled, his mother just smiles and keeps on trying to entice him to taste fruit, not just talk about it. That is until Grandpa comes to visit and enlists Oliver’s aid in making a big, colorful fruit salad.

Fast Food
Saxton Freyman and Joost Elffers
(Ages 3-6 years)
When you see piles of veggies lying sedately around the grocery store, you’d never guess what you can do with all that produce. Saxton Freymann has transformed those basking berries and lazy legumes into vegetable vehicle sculptures of every size and speed—veggies to go!

How My Parents Learned to Eat
Ina R. Friedman
(Ages 6-8)
In this book, which explores similarities and differences across cultures, an American sailor and a Japanese women secretly try to learn the other’s way of eating.

The Vegetables We Eat
Gail Gibbons
(Ages 5 and up)
Glossy watercolor-and-ink artwork depicts many vegetable varieties, with information about how they are grown and why they are good for us to eat.

The Beastly Feast
Bruce Goldstone
(Ages 3-5)
Textured illustrations add vibrancy to a rhyming poem about an animal picnic.

Orange Pear Apple Bear
Emily Gravett
(Ages 2-4 years)
This book has beautiful, softly-hued watercolor illustrations and contains only five words: “apple”, “pear”, “orange”, “bear” and “there.” Simple and compelling, children will enjoy reading this book over and over again as they learn many different concepts.

Bread and Jam for Frances
Russell Hoban
(Ages 4-8)
Mother must find a way to draw her daughter to more varied foods, or else Frances might have only bread and jam forever. Also available in Spanish.

When I’m Hungry
Jane Howard
(Ages 2-4 years)
A child imagines eating like a variety of animals (catching food or eating it off the trees), but decides that using a plate and glass is best.

Eat
Roberta Grobel Intrater
(Ages 9 months-2 years)
A group of babies enjoys some favorite foods — along with making a big mess on their faces when they eat.

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Stories to

Get Kids Moving

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Stories to

Get Kids Moving

Eyes, Nose, Fingers and Toes
Judy Hindley
(Ages 9 months-2 years)
A group of toddlers demonstrate all the fun things that they can do with their eyes, ears, mouths, hands, legs and feet.

Move
Steve Jenkins
(Ages 1-4 years)
Follow animals as they swing, dance, float, leap and slide from page to page, then learn why these animals move the way they do. Young readers can guess some of the unusual ways that animals get around.

Head, Shoulders, Knees and Toes
Anne Kubler
(Ages 9 months-2 years)
Sing along with this popular song as you show your baby the gorgeous pictures that help teach babies parts of the body.

Froggy Learns to Swim
Jonathan London
(Ages 3-6 years)
Froggy is afraid of the water until his mother — along with his flippers, snorkel and mask — help him learn to swim.

Dinosaurumpus
Tony Mitton
(Ages 3-7)
Join a rowdy group of dinosaurs as they shake, shudder, and stomp in a noisy, kinetic dance.

Tai Chi for Kids: Move With the Animals
Stuart Alve Olson
(Ages 4-8)
Children can imitate various animals as they learn the eight basic forms of tai chi, which can improve balance, attention, and overall health.

Doing the Animal Bop
Jan Ormerod
(Ages 2-4 years)
Various animals dance to the animal bop—including ostriches, elephants and monkeys.

Everyone Can Learn to Ride a Bicycle
Chris Raschka
(Ages 4-8)
Expressive pictures detail the ups and downs as a father teaches his daughter to ride a bike.

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Stories About

Reducing Screen Time

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Stories About

Reducing Screen Time

Berenstain Bears and Too Much TV
Stan & Jan Berenstain
(Ages 4-7 years)
When Mama Bear decides her family spends too much time in front of the TV, she bans it for a week. Then the Bear family finds other ways to have fun and keep busy, so they watch less when TV is allowed again. Also available in Spanish (Los Osos Berenstain y Demasiada Televisión).

Fix It
David McPhail
(Ages 2-5 years)
Emma wants to watch television one morning, but the set won’t work. While her parents try to fix it, Emma finds entertainment in a book instead. Even when the television is fixed, Emma is too busy reading her book to watch it.

Mama Rex and T Turn off the TV
Rachel Vail
(Ages 4-8 years)
It’s a rainy Saturday morning and T plans to watch TV all day long. Then suddenly, lightning flashes, thunder crashes and the room goes dark. The apartment has no power, and that means no TV for T. Now T’s day will be dull–or so he thinks. Mama Rex has a plan to fill T’s no-TV morning with rainy-day adventures.

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Stories About

Babies & Breastfeeding

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Stories About

Babies & Breastfeeding

Mama’s Milk

Michael Ross
(Ages 3-5 years)

Ross’s rhyming text describes the different ways that mothers (human and animal) nurse their babies. Each species is identified along with the proper name for its offspring.

 

Mama’s Milk Is All Gone

Ann Vernon
(Ages 2 -5 years)

The book recognizes the breastfeeding relationship that the child shared with their mother and how after weaning they have many different ways that they fill their physical and emotional needs in place of breastfeeding.